Barcode scanners come in several different formats. Some are fixed mount scanners which are typically seen in grocery stores where the scanner is fixed mounted to the checkout till counter and the clerk simply scans the grocery items past the scanner, where it picks up the barcode and reads it.

Another type of scanner is the handheld scanner which can be used similarly to the fixed mount scanner by using a scanning dock which allows clerks to pass items underneath the scanner to scan them. Clerks can also take the scanner out of the scanning dock and point the barcode scanner at the item being scanned such as for example in the case of buying a large bag of dog food that would not be easy to scan using a fixed mounted scanner.

These handheld barcode scanners are available both in wired models which support multiple interfaces such as the USB interface, as well as in wireless models which do not require any wiring. Typically, the wireless version of a scanner is much more expensive though, often costing double or even more than double the price of a wired scanner.

There are devices that are being developed right now, however, which promise to convert a standard wired barcode scanner into a cordless Bluetooth scanner. One such device is the SL-BA10 device from a company called Samlung.

Although information on this device is readily available on the Internet, it is also very difficult to track down the actual pricing on this unit or in fact find any stores which sell this item in North America. The manufacturer promises a 30-50% savings in using this device, compared to purchasing a cordless model, but without any actual pricing and stock availability, it is difficult to determine what the actual savings are.

Another thing to keep in mind is that most high-quality wireless barcode scanners come with scanning buffer memory which buffer the barcodes which were scanned should the barcode scanner be out of range of the scanning station. It is unclear whether the Samlung device performs such a function or whether it simply transmits the data, and if the scanner happens to be out of range the data is lost.

As more manufacturers create adaptors which convert USB data to a wireless Bluetooth signal, bar code scanner manufacturers will need to lower the prices charged for the wireless versions of their scanners. Until then, your best bet is to go with a good quality corded scanner, unless you are willing to pay double or more in cost for a wireless scanner, or until devices such as the SL-BA10 adaptor become readily available to the North American market.